Tuesday, August 30, 2011

The Randy Cartwright Interview - Part II

Randy with his camera operator, a kid named John Lasseter.

One of the few filmed records of Disney animation in the eary 1980s came about because of Mr. Cartwright's eagerness to try out a new sound 8 millimeter camera ...

TAG Interview with Randy Cartwright

Find all TAG Interviews on the TAG website at this link

The camera had a ten-minute cartridge, and I wasn't sure what to shoot. Then I decided to make a reak -time documentary walking through the Disney animation department ...

With his assistant John Lasseter serving as director of photography, Randy wandered up and down the halls, walking into the rooms of surprised animators. The whole thing, of course, was unauthorized and pretty much illegal, but today the film is stored in the Disney archives, a little piece of thirty-year-old studio history.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

iTunes is not allowing this to be downloaded (actually, both of them). And direct link is not working.

Any ideas?

Anonymous said...

I tried it and it doesn't work. What happened?!?

Steven Kaplan said...

Hosting company experiencing problems. I'm checking with them now.

Anonymous said...

Steve, can you interview Will Finn, Ruben Aquino, Tony de Rosa, Mark Henn, Dave Pruiksma, Nik Ranieri?

Steven Kaplan said...

Thanks for the suggestions Anon. Ruben Aquino was the first interview we did. Please check the interview page for that recording.

zoograyson said...

Did John Lasseter really work for Richard Williams? That has never been written down before. Anyone know about his?

Steve Hulett said...

No idea.

Christopher M. Sobieniak said...

I suppose that "Kondo" Randy mentioned was Yoshifumi Kondo (what I like to call the Joe Ranft of Ghibli myself). His version of Little Nemo might've proved something going by the pilot that was all that was realized of the project.

The creative differences Miyazaki had on it (and to an extent Isao Takahata that was also brought on to the Nemo project), often involved at least two specific things they found wrong about the story. For Miyazaki, it was simply that the character's adventure took place within the confines of a dream, most of his films usually took place in a world that the characters do exist and interact in without such illusions (Nausicaa certainly is a good example). Takahata himself went for more personal growth of the characters in his films for which he felt Nemo didn't possess any in his dreams.

Dan Siciliano said...

Nice interview with Mr. Cartwright, Steve. The most interesting story was the Prince of Egypt story. I know another story to that sequence. Originally, Hotep and Huy's song was supposed to be a comic relief song for the picture but the directors felt it didn't fit with the rest of the movie. And then, I made it a much more darker version. This is crazy! I'm mad at Prince of Egypt for being too serious. If there was more comedy, the clowns would be like Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, narrating the story in a lighter tone.

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